Big Data for Good: Fighting the flies

In the latest Big Data for Good feature, TDA affiliate Laura Kubatko, professor of statistics and evolution, ecology, and organismal biology, discusses her work using statistical techniques to protect the cassava plant in east Africa. Cassava is an essential part of people’s diets and the economy in parts of the region. Kubatko and her collaborators are figuring out how to stop white flies from spreading a virus that makes the plant rot and become useless for the families that grow it.

Big Data for Good No. 2: Laura Kubatko and protecting cassava

Check out Big Data for Good No. 1: Elisabeth Dowling Root and improving children’s health

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