A science first: Measuring glaciers from the sky

uwbrad1smallerResearchers from Ohio State recently returned from a journey measuring the internal temperatures of the Greenland ice sheet.

What makes this feat so impressive is for the first time they did it from an airplane.

Their work explores options for how scientists gather future data to help advance climate science and further understand the movement of glacial ice around the world.

With the help of NASA funding, Ohio State ElectroScience Laboratory Research Associates Mark Andrews and Domenic Belgiovane headed north in September to test the technology they created under the project, “UWBRAD: Ultra Wideband Software Defined Microwave Radiometer for Ice Sheet Subsurface Temperature Sensing.”

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