Kogan shares award to analyze politics' impact on learning

kogan2.6cc5a722 (2)TDA affiliate Vladimir Kogan, assistant professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Stéphane Lavertu, associate professor in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs, have received a Lyle Spencer Research Award to help improve understanding of political institutions governing U.S. public education so that they might be designed to promote democratic accountability and the efficient provision of K-12 education. For the Education Governance and Accountability Project, Kogan, Lavertu and their co-principal investigator, Emory University political scientist Zachary Peskowitz, will collect a decade of data on local school district elections across 20 states and apply rigorous statistical techniques to understand how the politics of public education affect school administration, instruction and student learning. More

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