Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation (InFACT)

NEW THOUGHT FOR FOOD

All of humanity depends upon safe, sufficient, affordable, accessible and nutritious food – but environmental, political, economic and cultural challenges pose threats to our food supply. Ohio State's interdisciplinary focus on food security is addressing these interdependent and complex problems – locally and globally.

Today, more than 250 diverse food and food-related experts are connecting to the ingenuity of our students, devote communities of farmers and engaged global partners to accelerate discovery and translate new thought into practical solutions. We are forming and scaling teams to pioneer multi-faceted physical, ecological, cultural and social models of food systems that promote health while balancing technology, ecological capacities, economics, justice and equity. Through public-private partnerships, we are expanding capacity to implement new food systems amidst environmental change and constraints.

Ohio State is leading new thought for food to create resilient and sustainable food systems. Click to hear Faculty Director Casey Hoy share the InFACT systems approach to transformation.

Program Leads

Faculty Director

Casey Hoy, PhD

Executive Director

Brian Snyder, MTS, PMBA

News

Food and AgriCultural Transformation

MINISTERING CLIMATE CHANGE: INFACT CO-SPONSORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE WITH KEYNOTE AL GORE

Faith leaders are among our nation's most trusted voices when it comes to ethical living, so it makes sense that they would be on the forefront of climate change initiatives. Keeping them informed about food and its impact on climate change was the goal of the On Food and Faith: Ministry in the Time of Climate Change conference sponsored by the Center for Earth Ethics, the Climate Reality Project, Methodist Theological School in Ohio (MTSO)—and The Ohio State University's Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation (InFACT).

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Food and AgriCultural Transformation

“Privy 2: Biosolids and You” coming soon to the OSU campus

The public installment of a research collaboration led by InFACT faculty hires Nick Kawa (assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology) and Forbes Lipschitz (assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Knowlton School) looks at the human waste stream.

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Food and AgriCultural Transformation

Ohio State Mansfield and FFAR launch $2 million food system project

The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) awarded a matching grant to the Ohio State University at Mansfield to launch a $2 million dollar urban sustainable food system project that will increase access to fruits, vegetables and other specialty crops while supporting the local economy.

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Food and AgriCultural Transformation

Buckeye ISA recruits over 30 families in Year 1

With the support of a three-year $750,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Initiative for Food and AgriCultural Transformation (InFACT)  launched the Buckeye Institution Supported Agriculture (ISA) program in 2018, providing low-income households with children supplies and training to grow produce for their household and community.

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Food and AgriCultural Transformation

Students Plant Seeds of Culture Change

Through the InFACT-led AgriCULTURE Gardens Initiative, a demonstration plot featuring native plants was seeded outside of Smith Lab in May 2018. In collaboration with Landscape Services, students from the Landscape Architecture program at Ohio State's Knowlton School designed the garden. Students from Ohio State's Sustainable Growing Club (GrOSU) and staff from InFACT will maintain the space.

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Food and AgriCultural Transformation

COMPAS Colloquium: Food Pyramid Scheme with Christopher Carter

InFACT is a proud co-sponsor of "Food Pyramid Scheme" with Christopher Carter, Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego. On April 16th, Carter will explore the structural inequalities that exist in the domestic food system for both producers and consumers, paying particular attention to the underlying sociological and theological assumptions that permit the current food system, whose shortcomings disproportionately affect communities of color, to be viewed as normative.

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